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Stan Becton | NCAA.com | March 12, 2022

8 things to know from Day 1 of the 2022 Division I indoor track and field championships 

2022 women's 5000m track and field championships

The 2022 Division I indoor track and field championships started off with a bang. Here's what you may have missed.

🏆: Live updates of the DI indoor Championships | Complete results

8 things to know from Day 1 of the 2022 Division I indoor track and field championships 

A new champion and a new record in the men's 5000 meters

Northern Arizona's Abdihamid Nur won the men's 5000 meters title in record-breaking fashion. Nur set a new NCAA indoor track and field championship record with his time of 13:19.01. He beat the previous record of 13:20.17, held by Stanford's Ky Robinson, en route to the victory. Nur's first-place finish in the 5000 meters led to a 1-3-8 finish in the event for Northern Arizona.

MORE: How a new champion and record occurred in the same men's 5000 meter race

One centimeter away from women's weight throw history

Ole Miss had never won a weight throw title entering the 2022 championships but they were the heavy favorites in today's event.

The Rebels lived up to expectations behind Shey Taiwo's title-winning throw in the final round of 25.55 meters. Taiwo's toss was just one centimeter away from tying the NCAA record. 

With the throw, Taiwo passed her teammate, Jasmine Mitchell, who was in the lead with a 24.94-meter mark.

Top Performers: Here are some of the top regular-season women's indoor track and field performances

The men's mile is still fast

In the mile, six men ran sub-four-minute miles, led by Jonathan Davis of Illinois. With the final tomorrow, all signs point to a sub-four-minute champion yet again.

IMPOSSIBLE?: Here's how more college athletes have run under the once-impossible four minute mile than ever before

Men's DMR

The men's DMR never disappoints. A long race came down to the final lap with 5 teams vying for the lead. That's when Texas freshman Yaseen Abdalla anchored the Longhorns, pulling away to victory in 9:25.20.

Abdalla held off Notre Dame star and Olympian Yared Nuguse on the last lap. Nuguse used a last-second burst to give the Irish a second-place time of 9:25.77, just .01 seconds in front of Wisconsin.

Texas' DMR win gives the Longhorns their first title in the event in 14 years.

ELITE: Here are some of the top regular-season men's indoor track and field performances

Women's sprints prelims

The women's 60 meters blazed from the first heat as Julien Alfred set a new NCAA record. 7.18 seconds was the time needed to qualify and even then, everyone at the mark didn't make the cut.

The 60 meter hurdles continued the electric atmosphere. 8.00 seconds was the cut off time, a time so fast that it knocked out the defending champion, Baylor's Ackera Nugent, from tomorrow's field.

The speedy sprints continued through the 200 meters. Kentucky's Abby Steiner effortlessly leads all qualifiers with her time of 22.45 seconds. The time was Steiner's sixth-fastest indoors, but the fastest time in facility and NCAA preliminary round history.

Champions

Here is every winner from Day 1 of the competition in the 2022 Division I indoor track and field championships.

  • Anna Hall | Florida | Pentathlon
  • Wayne Pinnock | Tennessee | Men's Long Jump
  • Bobby Colantonio | Alabama | Men's Weight Throw
  • Sondre Guttormsen | Princeton | Men's Pole Vault
  • Abdihamid Nur | Northern Arizona | Men's 5000 meters
  • Texas | Men's Distance Medley Relay
  • Shey Taiwo | Ole Miss | Women's Weight Throw
  • Jasmine Moore | Florida | Women's Long Jump
  • Courtney Wayment | BYU | Women's 5000 meters
  • Rachel Baxter | Virginia Tech | Women's Pole Vault
  • Arkansas | Women's Distance Medley Relay

Standings

Here are the standings after Day 1 of the competition in the 2022 Division I indoor track and field championships.

Men's standings (points)

1. Princeton (20)
2. Tennessee (18)
3. Northern Arizona (17)
4. Alabama (14)
5. Stanford (12)
6. Texas (10)
6. Washington (10)
8. BYU (8)
8. Kent State (8)
8. Notre Dame (8)
11. Texas Tech (6)
11. Wisconsin (6)
11. Georgia (6)
11. Sam Houston (6)
15. Florida State (5)
15. Rutgers (5)

Click or tap here for complete team score through Day 1

Women's standings (points)

1. Florida (22)
2. Ole Miss (21)
3. Virginia Tech (18)
3. Arkansas (18)
5. BYU (14)
6. Texas Tech (12)
6. NC State (12)
8. Notre Dame (11)
8. Oregon (11)
10. Duke (10)
11. Stanford (8)
11. High Point (8)
13. Texas A&M (6)
13. Alabama (6)
13. California (6)
13. Colorado State (6)

Click or tap here for complete team score through Day 1

What to watch for tomorrow

  • Georgia's Matthew Boling in the 200 meters, 60 meters and 4x400
    • While Georgia's Matthew Boling won't become the first man to win sprinting and jumping titles since Carl Lewis in 1981, he does have a great chance to take home hardware on Day 2. He'll be participating in the finals for the 200 meters, 60 meters and 4x400 meter relay.
  • Florida's Jasmine Moore in the triple jump
    • After becoming the first Florida Gator to win the indoor long jump title on Day 1, Jasmine Moore enters Day 2 with a chance to become the fifth DI woman to sweep long jump and triple jump titles. Moore is the current NCAA indoor triple jump record holder.
  • Kentucky's Abby Steiner in the 200 meters
    • Abby Steiner already holds the NCAA and American indoor 200 meters record at 22.09 seconds. The world record is 21.87, ran by Merlen Ottey of Jamaica in 1993. No one else in history has run sub-22 seconds. Could Steiner be the first? She'll also try to become the fifth woman to defend her 200 indoor title in back-to-back years.
  • Florida State's Trey Cunningham in the 60 meter hurdles
    • Florida State's Trey Cunningham cruised to a meet-leading 7.50-second finish to advance to the finals. Cunningham has the second-fastest time in NCAA history and trails only former Florida Gator Grant Holloway's time of 7.35 seconds. 
  • Men's 60 meters
    • The men's 60 meter will have a new champion and it won't be who you might expect after Day 1. That's because last year's defending champion, Oregon's Micah Williams, and the collegiate indoor record holder, Texas Tech's Terrence Jones, missed the cut after each false started.
  • Men's 400 meters
    • Florida and Iowa will each have three finalists in the men's 400 meters on Saturday. Also participating in the finals will be North Carolina A&T's Randolph Ross; Ross led the pack in the 400 meters with a time of 45.44. If Ross wins, it could go a long way towards the Aggies becoming the first HBCU since Morgan State in 1966 to win the indoor title.
  • Women's 60 meters and 60 meter hurdles
    • See above
  • Women's 4x400 meter relay
    • At the SEC Championships, Arkansas broke NCAA indoor 4x400 meter relay record by two seconds with a time of 3:24.09. It was the fourth-fastest time in the world. Britton Wilson ran the second-fastest split in history (49.83 seconds). 
    • In that same race, Texas A&M and Kentucky finished with top-10 marks all-time. Russia's 2006 world record of 3:23.37 in the event may be in reach. However, Arkansas, Texas A&M nor Kentucky are eligible for world record ratification because all four athletes on each relay team don’t compete for the same country. Nonetheless, it's something to watch for.

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